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Mutational analysis in the glycone binding pocket of Dalbergia cochinchinensis beta-glucosidase to increase catalytic efficiency toward mannosides

TitleMutational analysis in the glycone binding pocket of Dalbergia cochinchinensis beta-glucosidase to increase catalytic efficiency toward mannosides
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsRatananikom, K, Choengpanya, K, Tongtubtim, N, Charoenrat, T, Withers, SG, Kongsaeree, PT
JournalCARBOHYDRATE RESEARCH
Volume373
Pagination35-41
Date PublishedMAY 24
ISSN0008-6215
Abstract

Dalcochinase and Abg are glycoside hydrolase family 1 beta-glucosidases from Dalbergia cochinchinensis Pierre and Agrobacterium sp., respectively, with 35% sequence identity. However, Abg shows much higher catalytic efficiencies toward a broad range of glycone substrates than dalcochinase does, possibly due to the difference in amino acid residues around their glycone binding pockets. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace the amino acid residues of dalcochinase with the corresponding residues of Abg, generating three single mutants, F196H, S251V, and M369E, as well as the corresponding three double mutants and one triple mutant. Among these, the F196H mutant showed increases in catalytic efficiency toward almost all glycoside substrates tested, with the most improved catalytic efficiency being a 3-fold increase for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl beta-D-mannoside, suggesting a preferred polar residue at this position and consistent with the presence of histidine at this position in two other GH1 glycosidases from barley and rice that prefer beta-mannosides. In addition, the M369E mutation resulted in a small increase in catalytic efficiency for cleavage of p-nitrophenyl beta-D-galactoside. By contrast, the multiple mutants were up to 8-fold less efficient than the recombinant wild-type dalcochinase, and displayed primarily antagonistic interactions between these residues. Thus, differences in catalytic efficiency between dalcochinase and Abg are therefore not primarily due to differences in the residues that directly contact the substrate, but derive largely from contributions from more remote residues and the overall architecture of the active site. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI10.1016/j.carres.2012.10.018