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Electronic structure contributions to electron-transfer reactivity in iron-sulfur active sites: 1. Photoelectron spectroscopic determination of electronic relaxation.

TitleElectronic structure contributions to electron-transfer reactivity in iron-sulfur active sites: 1. Photoelectron spectroscopic determination of electronic relaxation.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsKennepohl, P, Solomon, EI
JournalInorg. Chem.
Volume42
Pagination679–88
ISSN0020-1669
KeywordsPhD
Abstract

Electronic relaxation, the change in molecular electronic structure as a response to oxidation, is investigated in [FeX(4)](2)(-)(,1)(-) (X = Cl, SR) model complexes. Photoelectron spectroscopy, in conjunction with density functional methods, is used to define and evaluate the core and valence electronic relaxation upon ionization of [FeX(4)](2)(-). The presence of intense yet formally forbidden charge-transfer satellite peaks in the PES data is a direct reflection of electronic relaxation. The phenomenon is evaluated as a function of charge redistribution at the metal center (Deltaq(rlx)) resulting from changes in the electronic structure. This charge redistribution is calculated from experimental core and valence PES data using a valence bond configuration interaction (VBCI) model. It is found that electronic relaxation is very large for both core (Fe 2p) and valence (Fe 3d) ionization processes and that it is greater in [Fe(SR)(4)](2)(-) than in [FeCl(4)](2)(-). Similar results are obtained from DFT calculations. The results suggest that, although the lowest-energy valence ionization (from the redox-active molecular orbital) is metal-based, electronic relaxation causes a dramatic redistribution of electron density ( approximately 0.7ē) from the ligands to the metal center corresponding to a generalized increase in covalency over all M-L bonds. The more covalent tetrathiolate achieves a larger Deltaq(rlx) because the LMCT states responsible for relaxation are significantly lower in energy than those in the tetrachloride. The large observed electronic relaxation can make significant contributions to the thermodynamics and kinetics of electron transfer in inorganic systems.

URLhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12562181
DOI10.1021/ic020330f