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Bacterial cellulose modified with xyloglucan bearing the adhesion peptide RGD promotes endothelial cell adhesion and metabolism - a promising modification for vascular grafts

TitleBacterial cellulose modified with xyloglucan bearing the adhesion peptide RGD promotes endothelial cell adhesion and metabolism - a promising modification for vascular grafts
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsFink, H, Ahrenstedt, L, Bodin, A, Brumer, H, Gatenholm, P, Krettek, A, Risberg, B
JournalJournal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
Volume5
Pagination454-463
Abstract

Today, biomaterials such as polytetrafluorethylene (ePTFE) are used clinically as prosthetic grafts for vascular surgery of large vessels (>5 mm). In small diameter vessels, however, their performance is poor due to early thrombosis. Bacterial-derived cellulose (BC) is a new promising material as a replacement for blood vessels. This material is highly biocompatible in vivo but shows poor cell adhesion. In the native blood vessel, the endothelium creates a smooth non-thrombogenic surface. In order to sustain cell adhesion, BC has to be modified. With a novel xyloglucan (XG) glycoconjugate method, it is possible to introduce the cell adhesion peptide RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) onto bacterial cellulose. The advantage of the XG-technique is that it is an easy one-step procedure carried out in water and it does not weaken or alter the fiber structure of the hydrogel. In this study, BC was modified with XG and XGRGD to asses primary human vascular endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and metabolism as compared with unmodified BC. This XG-RGD-modification significantly increased cell adhesion and the metabolism of seeded primary endothelial cells as compared with unmodified BC whereas the proliferation rate was affected only to some extent. The introduction of an RGD-peptide to the BC surface further resulted in enhanced cell spreading with more pronounced stress fiber formation and mature phenotype. This makes BC together with the XG-method a promising material for synthetic grafts in vascular surgery and cardiovascular research. Copyright. (C) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI10.1002/term.334