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Fluorescence imaging of the oxidative desorption of a BODIPY-alkyl-thiol monolayer coated Au bead

TitleFluorescence imaging of the oxidative desorption of a BODIPY-alkyl-thiol monolayer coated Au bead
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsMusgrove, A, Kell, A, Bizzotto, D
JournalLangmuir
Volume24
Pagination7881-7888
Date PublishedAug
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number0743-7463
KeywordsALKANETHIOL MONOLAYERS, Au(111), COUPLED DIRECTIONAL EMISSION, DIPYRROMETHENEBORON DIFLUORIDE BODIPY, DNA, electrode, GENERATION, GOLD SURFACES, PHOTOCURRENT, PHOTONIC MODE DENSITY, REDUCTIVE DESORPTION, SELF-ASSEMBLED MONOLAYERS
Abstract

The reductive and oxidative desorption of a BODIPY labeled alkylthiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on ALL was studied using electrochemical methods coupled with fluorescence microscopy and image analysis procedures to monitor the removal of the adsorbed layer. Two SAMs were formed using two lengths of the alkyl chain (C 10 and C 16). The BODIPY fluorescent moiety used is known to form dimers which through donor-acceptor energy transfer results in red-shifted fluorescence. Fluorescence from the monomer and dimer were used to study the nature of the desorbed molecules during cyclic step changes in potential. The reductive desorption was observed to occur over a small potential window (0.15 V) signified by an increase in capacitance and in fluorescence. Oxidative readsorption was also observed through a decrease in capacitance and a lack of total removal of the fluorescent layer. Removal by oxidative desorption Occurred at positive potentials over a broad potential range near the oxidation of the bare An. The resulting fluorescence showed that the desorbed molecules remained near the electrode Surface and were not dispersed over the 20 s waiting time. The rate of change of the fluorescence for oxidative desorption was much slower than the reductive desorption. Comparing monomer and dimer fluorescence intensities indicated that the dimer was formed on the Au surface and desorbed as a dimer, rather than forming from desorbed monomers near the electrode surface. The dimer fluorescence can only be observed through energy transfer from the excited monomer suggesting that the monomers and dimers must be in close proximity in aggregates near the electrode. The fluorescence yield for longer alkyl chain was always lower presumably due to its decreased solubility in the interfacial region resulting in a more efficient fluorescence quenching. The oxidative desorption process results in a significantly etched or roughened electrode Surface Suggesting the coupling of thiol oxidative removal and Au oxide formation which results in the removal of Au from the electrode.

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