Research & Faculty

Default Header Image

Crystallization of aqueous inorganic-malonic acid particles: Nucleation rates, dependence on size, and dependence on the ammonium-to-sulfate

TitleCrystallization of aqueous inorganic-malonic acid particles: Nucleation rates, dependence on size, and dependence on the ammonium-to-sulfate
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsParsons, MT, Riffell, JL, Bertram, AK
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry A
Volume110
Pagination8108-8115
Date PublishedJul
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number1089-5639
KeywordsAEROSOL-PARTICLES, ATMOSPHERIC PARTICLES, BALANCE, ELECTRODYNAMIC, HETEROGENEOUS NUCLEATION, HYGROSCOPIC PROPERTIES, MIXTURES, ORGANIC-COMPOUNDS, PHASE-TRANSITIONS, RELATIVE-HUMIDITY, WATER-UPTAKE
Abstract

Using an electrodynamic balance, we determined the relative humidity ( RH) at which aqueous inorganic-malonic acid particles crystallized, with ammonium sulfate ((NH4)(2)SO4), letovicite ((NH4)(3)H(SO4)(2)), or ammonium bisulfate (NH4HSO4) as the inorganic component. The results for (NH4)(2)SO4-malonic acid particles and (NH4)(3)H(SO4)(2)-malonic acid particles show that malonic acid decreases the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles by less than 7% RH when the dry malonic acid mole fraction is less than 0.25. At a dry malonic acid mole fraction of about 0.5, the presence of malonic acid can decrease the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles by up to 35% RH. For the NH4HSO4-malonic acid particles, the presence of malonic acid does not significantly modify the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles for the entire range of dry malonic acid mole fractions studied; in all cases, either the particles did not crystallize or the crystallization RH was close to 0% RH. Size dependent measurements show that the crystallization RH of aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 particles is not a strong function of particle volume. However, for aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4-malonic acid particles ( with dry malonic acid mole fraction) 0.36), the crystallization RH is a stronger function of particle volume, with the crystallization RH decreasing by 6 +/- 3% RH when the particle volume decreases by an order of magnitude. To our knowledge, these are the first size dependent measurements of the crystallization RH of atmospherically relevant inorganic-organic particles. These results suggest that for certain organic mole fractions the particle size and observation time need to be considered when extrapolating laboratory crystallization results to atmospheric scenarios. For aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 particles, the homogeneous nucleation rate data are a strong function of RH, but for aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4-malonic acid particles (with dry organic mole fraction = 0.36), the rates are not as dependent on RH. The homogeneous nucleation rates for aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 particles were parametrized using classical nucleation theory, and from this analysis we determined that the interfacial surface tension between the crystalline ammonium sulfate critical nucleus and an aqueous ammonium sulfate solution is between 0.053 and 0.070 J m(-2).

URL<Go to ISI>://000238645600017